Farm to Table

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Poultry : Use precautions to keep backyard chickens safe

More than a million backyard chicken flocks provide Americans with eggs, meat or companionship, a trend Mississippians embrace, but hobby farmers must...
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Farming : Annie’s Project helps women succeed in agriculture

Exploring the move from hobby farm to farm-for-profit is what drew Angela Berryhill to Annie’s Project.   Annie’s Project, a nonprofit resour...
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Trade : U.S. calls out India for rice, wheat subsidies

Last week, in an action long called for by USA Rice, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has asked the World Trade Organization’s...
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Cooking : Rice flour a “secret” ingredient that makes everything better

Trends show that both in the restaurant and at home, chefs are increasingly using rice flour to fry foods. Frying doesn’t have to involve a thic...
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Gardening : Celosia almost guarantee summer garden success

When I was beginning my horticulture journey after making a career transition, I thought I had some idea about color and planting combinations. I woul...
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Produce safety rule training sessions set for Johnson, Marion counties in May

Arkansas fruit and vegetable growers will have two opportunities in May to attend training to comply with the new produce safety rule under Food Safet...
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Arkansas : Biennial pecan grafting workshop rescheduled for April 14

The biennial pecan grafting workshop, which is offered every other year by the White County Cooperative Extension Service, has been rescheduled for Sa...
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Louisiana : Controlling snails and slugs

Many gardeners consider snails and slugs to be the most disgusting pests in the garden. I could live with their looks if they just didn’t cause so m...
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Arkansas : Micro-loans, niche marketing key to small operation success

Farming on any scale can be tough. Whether  a multi-generational farm family working hundreds of acres of row crops or a new grower cultivating speci...
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Missouri : White oaks add depth to world’s wines and whiskey

Many of the world’s finest wines and whiskeys begin in Missouri’s hardwood forests.   University of Missouri Extension forester Hank Stelzer ...